GRI-oriented table of contents

Our sustainability-related communication aims to serve the interests of different target groups, all the while ensuring transparent reporting that can be used as a basis of comparison. Moreover, the contents and structure of our reporting are based on current sustainability reporting standards, in accordance with the UN Global Compact, the German Sustainability Index, and the Global Reporting Initiative. The following is an overview of non-financial information based on the GRI standards (published in 2016). We are currently working on adapting our reporting in accordance with this standard. With this table, we aim to help our target groups gain a quick overview of information concerning our company’s sustainability-related performance.

 

 

Universal standard disclosures

The Bosch Group is a leading global supplier of technology and services. It employs roughly 389,000 associates worldwide (as of December 31, 2016). The company generated sales of 73.1 billion euros in 2016.

As a leading IoT company, Bosch offers innovative solutions for smart homes, smart cities, connected mobility, and connected manufacturing. It uses its expertise in sensor technology, software, and services, as well as its own IoT cloud, to offer its customers connected, cross-domain solutions from a single source. The Bosch Group’s strategic objective is to create solutions for a connected life. Bosch improves quality of life worldwide with products and services that are innovative and spark enthusiasm. In short, Bosch creates technology that is “Invented for life.” The Bosch Group comprises Robert Bosch GmbH and its roughly 440 subsidiaries and regional companies in some 60 countries. Including sales and service partners, Bosch’s global manufacturing, engineering, and sales network covers nearly every country in the world. The basis for the company’s future growth is its innovative strength. At 120 locations across the globe, Bosch employs some 59,000 associates in research and development.

Its operations are divided into four business sectors: Mobility Solutions, Industrial Technology, Consumer Goods, and Energy and Building Technology:

Mobility Solutions

Bosch brings together comprehensive expertise in vehicle technology with hardware, software, and services to offer complete mobility solutions. More 

Consumer Goods

Perfect technology for your home and garden. More

Industrial Technology

Bosch offers innovative products and services for industry and trades. More

Energy and Building Technology

Extensive expertise in connectivity. Simply.Connected. Connected products, services, and solutions. More 

The Bosch Group is a global supplier of technology and services. It encompasses around 440 subsidiaries and regional companies in approximately 60 countries.

Find more information at the magazine of Bosch heute 2017, p. 30ff.

Robert Bosch Stiftung GmbH has been the majority shareholder since 1964, and currently holds around 92 percent of the shares. As a not-for-profit foundation, Robert Bosch Stiftung GmbH has no influence on the strategic or business orientation of the Bosch Group. The voting rights accruing to its share are held by Robert Bosch Industrietreuhand KG, an industrial trust, which performs the entrepreneurial ownership functions. The trust itself holds a share of 0.01 percent. Most of the remaining shares and voting rights are held by the founder’s descendants. This ownership structure guarantees the Bosch Group’s entrepreneurial independence, allowing the company to plan for the long term and make significant upfront investments in its future.



The Bosch Group is a global supplier of technology and services, and generates about 47 percent of its sales outside Europe. It encompasses around 440 subsidiaries and regional companies in approximately 60 countries.

More information on sales trends in regional markets can be found in the annual report 2016, p. 50ff.  

 

 

Revenue structure in regional markets (figures in millions of euros)
Sales by registered office of the customer Non-current assets (¹)
2016*2015*2016*2015*
Europe38,62837,34620,26719,849
of which Germany14,54814,17912,71412,347
of which the U.K.3,8633,638440495
of which France3,0372,996436450
of which Italy2,3722,244510511
Americas13,70514,0523,8933,756
of which the U.S.10,36011,0183,2793,195
Asia19,83418,2256,9926,927
of which China12,46511,1334,9865,039
of which Japan 2,2212,009530507
Other regions962984107100
Group 73,12970,60731,25930,632

The Bosch Group is a leading global supplier of technology and services. It employs roughly 389,000 associates worldwide (as of December 31, 2016). The company generated sales of 73.1 billion euros in 2016. 

 

More information can be found at the report on economic position as part of the annual report 2016, p.48ff. 

The total number of Bosch Group associates rose by around 14,500 to approximately 389,300 at the end of 2016, compared with 374,800 at the end of 2015. Of these new associates, some 1,600 were the result of a large number of small-scale consolidations. New hires thus increased the total headcount by around 12,900, after allowing for staff turnover and personnel adjustments. The disposal of activities did not have any major impact in 2016, as the sales that were announced had yet to take effect. Restructuring measures affected the Drive and Control Technology division in particular in 2016.

More detailed information about the development of employment figures can be found at our annual report 2016, p.53ff.

Changes in the consolidated group affected sales to the tune of roughly 130 million euros in 2016. These were essentially due to the inclusion of the former joint venture Automotive Steering for a full year for the first time. In the previous year, it was fully consolidated for only 11 months. Moreover, sales of the packaging machinery manufacturer Kliklok-Woodman Corporation, Decatur, GA (USA), and of its sister company Kliklok International Ltd., Bristol, United Kingdom, were fully consolidated for the first time. When comparing the figures with those from the previous year, the sale of the large gearboxes business in the Drive and Control Technology division must also be taken into account, as this was included for 11 months of 2015.

With comprehensive sustainability management and clear responsibilities, Bosch ensures that sustainability is a firmly established part of the company’s approach to doing business. In addressing sustainability-related topics, three bodies cooperate closely with one another:

1. The sustainability office is run by the Bosch Group’s sustainability experts. It is in charge of identifying the topics that are relevant for the company and recommending measures accordingly. In addition to this, the office handles internal and external queries and stays in touch with important stakeholders and organizations, such as Transparency International, the econsense CSR Forum, and the Compliance and Integrity Forum.

2. The sustainability council addresses the stakeholders’ CSR-related questions and discusses their relevance for Bosch. On this basis, it develops recommendations for the steering committee. In addition to this, it evaluates the sustainability office’s work. The council comprises the heads of corporate departments such as purchasing, production, and environment, as well as the heads of various divisions.

3. The chairman of the board of management gsits on the sustainability steering committee, as do other members of upper management and permanent members of the sustainability council. The committee ensures that the Bosch Group’s strategic direction maintains the right balance between economic, ecological, and social topics. In addition, it sets sustainability-related focal points and targets for the specialist departments and divisions. During an annual management review, the steering committee assesses whether set targets have been met.

More information about the management structure can be found here:
Robert Bosch GmbH
Organizational sustainability

In regards to their societal impact, Bosch acts different from other companies similar to their size: 92 percent of Bosch GmbH shares are currently held by the Robert Bosch Stiftung GmbH, assigning a crucial role as the majority shareholder.

Other important stakeholders for Bosch include:

  • Associates – exchanges take place through ongoing dialogs and regular feedback meetings with supervisors. In addition to this, Bosch conducts a global associate survey every two years. Among other things, the associates are surveyed about their working conditions, the extent to which they identify with the company’s values, and the balance between their personal and professional lives.
  • Customers – Bosch has intensive and regular exchanges with its automotive industry customers, who show a high interest in sustainability-related topics. We are involved in a number of joint ventures, especially in the areas of powertrain electrification and automated driving. For example, in cooperation with Daimler AG, Bosch has founded the EM-motive GmbH joint venture to develop and manufacture electric motors for electric and hybrid vehicles. In addition to this, Bosch works with companies such as TomTom, car2go, Daimler, the Boston Consulting Group, and Google to develop technologies for automated vehicles.
  • Suppliers – We conduct contract negotiations as well as environmental and social audits (see 4.4) with many of our suppliers. We also discuss environmental and social topics with them.
  • Universities and research institutes – Here, Bosch supports research in areas that are relevant for the company, including energy efficiency, renewable energies, and powertrain electrification. At the same time, Bosch offers students and graduates opportunities to write their bachelor’s or master’s theses, or even their PhD disserations on practical sustainability-related topics.


Other stakeholders include people who live in the surroundings of Bosch locations worldwide, politicians, non-governmental organizations in the environmental and social sectors, banks, insurance companies, the media, churches, as well as the representatives of public authorities. Wherever needed, Bosch engages in discussions and exchanges with these stakeholders.

In addition to this, via its sustainability office, Bosch actively participates in a number of committees to make sure that sustainability-related topics are addressed and that measures are developed accordingly. For instance, in 2015, the company contributed to revising the ISO 14001 standard. What is more, Bosch representatives also delivered keynote speeches, moderated workshops, and acted as panelists at several international sustainability conferences. Bosch is also an active member of business associations such as econsense and B.A.U.M. It is also a member of Transparency International, the Compliance and Integrity Forum, and of the U.N. Global Compact. Bosch also supports the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) as a GOLD Community member (previously known as organizational stakeholder).

More information about our stakeholders can be found here

In Germany, the majority of employees are covered through collective and works agreements.

Currently the Bosch report content does not meet the requirements of the GRI standards. A gradual approach towards the standard is planned for the near future.

Currently the Bosch report content does not meet the requirements of the GRI standards. A gradually designed approach towards the standard is planned for the near future.
In order to set an even stronger focus on the relevant topics of our sustainable engagement for our stakeholders, as well as on the SDGs and social challenges, we are planning to further expand our knowledge on our materiality analysis in 2017.

01/01/2016 – 12/31/2016

Head of Bosch sustainability offices
Bernhard Schwager
Phone +497118116402
Fax +497118117082
E-Mail Bernhard.Schwager(at)de.bosch.com

For an improved standardization of sustainability reporting, Bosch uses the GRI standard for orientation. A gradually designed approach towards the standard is planned for the near future.

102-55 GRI content index

Topic-specific standards

Compliance is an integral component of Bosch’s corporate values. "We promise only what we can deliver, accept agreements as binding, and respect and observe the law in all our business transactions" says the company’s "We are Bosch” mission statement. To underscore the importance of this maxim, the company has summarized all the basic rules of conduct, including the main legal requirements for associates, in its "Code of Business Conduct”.

Bosch also has a central "Compliance Committee", whose work is supported by compliance officers across regions. Prevention and control measures include the double-checking rule, job rotation in sensitive areas, the strict separation of operational and monitoring systems, as well as regular audits.
The compliance system also includes a reporting system. Associates, business partners, and third parties all have the possibility to report irregular conduct to a compliance officer using e-mail or a special hotline. By operating mandatory training courses, Bosch ensures that all associates are acquainted with the compliance principles and know how, and to whom, they can report violations. It is particularly important that acts that suggest criminal activity, such as theft, fraud or bribery, or a systematic transgression of the law or internal company rules, such as deliberate and sustained non-compliance with quality/safety standards or the Bosch Basic Principles of Social Responsibility, be reported.

The effectiveness of the existing compliance management system was comprehensively tested and confirmed by external auditors in 2014. Independently of that, Bosch has decided on a series of measures to strengthen its compliance structures. These include an intensive exchange on compliance issues between managers and associates. The aim is to develop the current, mainly rule-based compliance system into a system based primarily on values.

Bosch has been a member of Transparency International since 1995 and takes part in the DNWE compliance & integrity forum (German network of Business Ethics).

Bosch is meeting this challenge by, among other things, having concrete sustainability goals, using the "Design for Environment" approach to sustainable product design, taking environmental measures at Bosch locations (e.g. the successful introduction of environmental management systems at all Bosch plants), and consistently monitoring our sustainability activities.

At Bosch, environmental monitoring is coordinated by the department for health, fire and environmental safety. Experts gather and evaluate the key figures on site. In its observations on water supply, for example, Bosch distinguishes between the public supply and its own water supply. As regards waste, the company looks separately at waste for recycling, waste for disposal, construction waste, and hazardous waste. Our figures on energy requirements are broken down by energy sources: electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, liquefied gas, district heating, coal, coke, and renewable sources. To systematically conserve energy and resources in line with understanding of sustainability, we consider the environmental impact of our business activity throughout the entire product lifecycle - from the development phases to recycling potential.

I. Product development

Bosch products across all divisions have continuously become more eco-friendly in recent years. The systematic "Design for Environment" (DfE) approach has contributed significantly to this success. Since its introduction in 2000, Bosch has made it a rule to optimize products in the development process based on four key criteria:

  • How can the consumption of energy and raw materials be reduced (energy and raw material efficiency)?
  • Can emissions and immissions be reduced (emissions and immissions efficiency)?
  • Can the amount of materials used be reduced, and can materials that are less harmful to the environment be used (materials efficiency)?
  • How can maintenance be improved (waste management efficiency)?


The aim of DfE is to improve a product in environmental terms over the course of its life cycle. Specially trained DfE coordinators advise and support the respective units on meeting current requirements to ensure environmentally sound product development. Meanwhile, a training module with comprehensive documentation for seminars and self-study programs ensures that associates involved in product development (e.g. from purchasing, development and distribution) have the requisite background knowledge.

The environment and safety portfolio is another sustainability-related feature at Bosch. It comprises products and services that contribute to protecting the environment and conserving resources. It also includes products that promote good health or contribute to making life safer. Before products are included in the environment and security portfolio, internal environmental experts test them according to a set of specific criteria and sustainability indicators. Each year, Bosch increases spending on research and development for its environmental and safety (55 percent of R&D expenditure in 2016). The share of total sales is also calculated and published in the sustainability report (42,2 per cent share of group sales in 2016).

II. Procurement
In 2012, Bosch began to expand its definition of environmentally sound design. The goal is to uncouple growth and resource consumption. As sales rise, Bosch aims to systematically reduce the relative amount of raw materials used. To this end, the company is active in the Resource Alliance, an industry-funded exchange and consultancy platform that analyses developments in raw materials markets, among other things. Using scenario analysis, the Resource Alliance supports participating companies with evaluating future developments and their impacts and developing appropriate solutions.

III. Production
Economical and sustainable use of natural resources not only makes ecological sense. Globalization has made the raw materials used in industry scarcer and, as a result, more expensive. In order to systematically conserve resources, an environmental management system operating to ISO 14001 standards has been introduced at all Bosch locations. During implementation, various local best-practice initiatives emerged, which have been shared with the entire Bosch community environment Wiki and created several imitators. Bosch has also defined sustainability management rules and processes for its suppliers. All contracts with suppliers make observance of the International Labor Organization’s (ILO) core labor standards and general environmental standards mandatory. These include, for instance, bans on the use of environmentally hazardous substances, and obligations to declare. Bosch monitors whether suppliers are aware of and complying with these requirements through supplier audits. It also expects its 500 preferred suppliers to apply a certified environmental management system.

Bosch also has detailed knowledge of the nature and volume of raw materials used in its products, which is summarized in so-called materials data sheets and made available throughout the supply chain. In the automotive industry, a detailed list of the raw materials used is part of the customer-specific requirements that manufacturers demand of their suppliers. Bosch meets these requirements in full.

IV. Using & reusing
Bosch is committed, both at the divisional level and through on-site initiatives, to recycling materials wherever possible. Two examples:

  • In the Bosch eXchange program, used car parts are industrially recycled. Refurbished starters, alternators, and ignition distributors are, for example, used in vehicle repairs and are up to 40 percent cheaper than the equivalent new parts. Around 2.5 million parts are reused each year. Recycling saves 23,000 tons of CO2 compared with the production of new parts.
  • Under the "Zero to Landfill" program, the Bosch plant in Worcester, England takes back old boilers and recycles them. About one ton of plastic is recovered weekly and used, among other things, for the production of garden sheds for a local project.


More information on the usage of natural resources can be found here
Environmental management
Design for environment

Energy consumption
200720092011201320142015*2016*
Total energy consumption (gigawatthours) ⁽⁴⁾6,707.205,468.006,701.106,217.706,104.407,451.707,602.27
Electricity (gigawatthours) ⁽⁵⁾4,537.803,613.704,704.004,352.804,399.705,173.905,317.11
Natural gas (gigawatthours) ⁽⁶⁾1,234.101,065.601,118.001,140.901,071.901,469.701,512.65
Heating oil (gigawatthours) ⁽⁷⁾211.50177.30148.70112.8089.30110.9097.00
Liquified gas (gigawatthours) ⁽⁶⁾86.9069.7079.8048.5045.90101.3038.90
Remote heat (gigawatthours) ⁽⁸⁾199.40196.30201.60184.40173.10203.40210.60
Coal (megawatthours) ⁽⁶⁾0.007.8053.300.000.00349.40363.10
Coke (gigawatthours) ⁽⁶⁾164.80110.60173.90148.90148.00135.30121.30
Renewable energy (gigawatthours) ⁽⁹⁾0.0029.008.8040.4018.5029.3039.30

Regional data about those key figures can be found in our interactive charts

Water consumption
200720092011201320142015*2016*
Total water consumption (Millionen cubic meters) 17.3013.3017.3016.6017.2019.3019.36
Water from public supply (Millionen cubic meters) 9.808.5011.4010.7011.2012.9013.31
Water from own supply (Millionen cubic meters)7.504.805.905.906.006.406.05

Regional data about those key figures can be found in our interactive charts

Bosch reports its emissions in accordance with the requirements of CDP. Overall the company achieved a disclosure score of more than 87 of 100 available points in 2016. The performance score is therefor set at C.

CO₂ emissions
200720092011201320142015*2016*
Total CO₂ emissions (thousand metric tonnes) ⁽¹⁾2,586.402,106.402,655.102,484.802,524.903,048.603,131.16
CO₂ emissions from combustion processes (thousand metric tonnes)393.80325.70356.20330.00309.30403.30388.86
CO₂ emissions from consumption of electricity (thousand metric tonnes) ⁽²⁾2,009.801,620.502,115.901,990.202,047.702,462.702,550.08
CO₂ emissions from consumption of remote heat (thousand metric tonnes)108.30105.30110.50100.3098.70112.90119.23

Regional data about those key figures can be found in our interactive charts

Bosch reports its emissions in accordance with the requirements of CDP. Overall the company achieved a disclosure score of more than 87 of 100 available points in 2016. The performance score is therefor set at C.

CO₂ emissions
200720092011201320142015*2016*
Total CO₂ emissions (thousand metric tonnes) ⁽¹⁾2,586.402,106.402,655.102,484.802,524.903,048.603,131.16
CO₂ emissions from combustion processes (thousand metric tonnes)393.80325.70356.20330.00309.30403.30388.86
CO₂ emissions from consumption of electricity (thousand metric tonnes) ⁽²⁾2,009.801,620.502,115.901,990.202,047.702,462.702,550.08
CO₂ emissions from consumption of remote heat (thousand metric tonnes)108.30105.30110.50100.3098.70112.90119.23

Regional data about those key figures can be found in our interactive charts

Bosch reports its emissions in accordance with the requirements of CDP. Overall the company achieved a disclosure score of more than 87 of 100 available points in 2016. The performance score is therefor set at C.

CO₂ emissions
200720092011201320142015*2016*
Total CO₂ emissions (thousand metric tonnes) ⁽¹⁾2,586.402,106.402,655.102,484.802,524.903,048.603,131.16
CO₂ emissions from combustion processes (thousand metric tonnes)393.80325.70356.20330.00309.30403.30388.86
CO₂ emissions from consumption of electricity (thousand metric tonnes) ²⁾2,009.801,620.502,115.901,990.202,047.702,462.702,550.08
CO₂ emissions from consumption of remote heat (thousand metric tonnes)108.30105.30110.50100.3098.70112.90119.23

Regional data about those key figures can be found in our interactive charts

Other emissions
200720092011201320142015*2016*
Clorinated hydrocarbons (metric tonnes)17.400.000.100.013.301.900.01
Volatile organic compounds (VOC) (metric tonnes)1,122.50704.801,549.801,218.201,204.601,181.201,366.56
Carbon monoxide (metric tonnes) ⁽³⁾ 170.70155.70180.80159.80154.30199.40192.25
Nitrogen oxides (metric tonnes) ⁽³⁾ 585.10505.70560.60498.10465.30585.50632.70
Sulfur dioxide (metric tonnes) ⁽³⁾ 347.60259.20342.30244.80234.70227.70202.70
Nitrous oxide (metric tonnes) ⁽³⁾ 1.801.401.70469.40374.70390.90382.66
Methane (metric tonnes) ⁽³⁾ 12.8010.1012.40235.00292.00331.80333.72
Dust (metric tonnes) ⁽³⁾ 14.7011.9013.909.608.9010.008.84
Volatile organic compounds (metric tonnes) ⁽³⁾ 18.2015.2017.5016.4015.3017.9019.11

Regional data about those key figures can be found in our interactive charts

Wastewater
200720092011201320142015*2016*
Total wastewater (Millionen cubic meters) ⁽¹¹⁾13.9010.5013.7013.4013.6015.5015.24
Domestic wastewater (Millionen cubic meters)5.304.705.905.705.706.907.14
Treated process wastewater (Millionen cubic meters)2.101.702.702.302.402.802.72
Untreated process wastewater (Millionen cubic meters) 6.504.105.105.405.505.805.38

Regional data about those key figures can be found in our interactive charts

Waste
200720092011201320142015*2016*
Total waste (thousand metric tonnes) ⁽¹¹⁾ 520.10371.40546.70454.60471.60675.20692.47
Waste for recovery (thousand metric tonnes)416.20283.10436.20356.10365.70547.10556.97
Waste for disposal (thousand metric tonnes)104.0088.30110.5098.50105.90128.00135.51
Demolition waste (thousand metric tonnes)102.7022.2045.70118.60145.8044.50214.05
Hazardous waste (thousand metric tonnes)78.5064.0097.8077.1073.5083.4083.60

Regional data about those key figures can be found in our interactive charts

Waste
200720092011201320142015*2016*
Total waste (thousand metric tonnes) ⁽¹¹⁾ 520.10371.40546.70454.60471.60675.20692.47
Waste for recovery (thousand metric tonnes)416.20283.10436.20356.10365.70547.10556.97
Waste for disposal (thousand metric tonnes)104.0088.30110.5098.50105.90128.00135.51
Demolition waste (thousand metric tonnes)102.7022.2045.70118.60145.8044.50214.05
Hazardous waste (thousand metric tonnes)78.5064.0097.8077.1073.5083.4083.60

Regional data about those key figures can be found in our interactive charts

Audits
2011201320142015*2016*
Sustainability audits of suppliers (count)57101113104143

In the Bosch Principles of Social Responsibility, management and associate representatives profess to respect human rights, equal opportunities, and fair working conditions, and to uphold global standards in occupational health and safety. Bosch ensures the latter with a health and safety management system that is based on the internationally recognized OHSAS 18001 standard, which has been rolled out at all locations. Around 100 locations have been certified by an independent certification organization.

The Bosch Principles of Social Responsibility are based on the core labor standards developed by the International Labor Organization (ILO). The heads of the various business divisions, regional subsidiaries, and Bosch locations are responsible for their implementation. Every associate is informed of the substance of the principles and has the possibility to report violations. The same goes for violations of the Code of Business Conduct, which builds on the Bosch Principles of Social Responsibility and includes legal provisions and internal company regulations, in particular in the area of compliance. The Code of Business Conduct is aimed at associates and business partners worldwide.

Bosch is also committed to compliance with social standards at the supplier level. Bosch’s purchasing conditions state: "The supplier commits to complying with the relevant regulations on dealing with employees, environmental protection, and safety in the workplace, and to work to limit any adverse impact from its activities on people and the environment." The basis for Bosch’s requirements for suppliers are the ILO’s labor standards, with their four basic principles: freedom of association, abolition of forced labor, elimination of child labor, and prohibiting discrimination in employment or occupation. Furthermore, Bosch has been a member of the United Nations Global Compact since 2004. In its annual progress report, the company details how these principles and measures are helping to guarantee workers' rights, both within the company and among its suppliers.

Bosch’s social activities have always been oriented toward the common good, in particular the promotion of equal opportunity through education. At nearly all Bosch locations worldwide, there are initiatives that enable associates to volunteer for social projects. To provide both targeted and long-term aid, Bosch has set up foundations in different countries. These non-profit organizations are currently implementing educational and social projects in China, Brazil, India, and the US.

Bosch supports this commitment for two reasons. First, the volunteers reflect Bosch values by working for a cohesive society, and second, they demonstrate team spirit and develop creative solutions to problems - skills that contribute directly to the company’s innovative strength. This is why supporting a local social enterprise in the implementation of a project is part of the program for up and coming executives in Germany.

More information can be found here

Accidents
200720092011201320142015*2016*
Accidents at work (count)2,9601,7462,1271,7871,6642,1251,849
Accident rate (accidents per million work hours)6.84.74.33.63.13.22.7
Lost workdays (count)38,41723,97329,07927,16423,53334,43728,992

Regional data about those key figures can be found in our interactive charts

Training
200720092011201320142015*2016*
Participants (thousand)413519529461515516494
Total days of training (thousand)582667706628663773734
Training
200720092011201320142015*2016*
Participants (thousand)413519529461515516494
Total days of training (thousand)582667706628663773734
Portion of women in leadership positions
2011201320142015*2016*
Portion of women in leadership positions (%)10.712.212.913.615.4
Audits
2011201320142015*2016*
Sustainability audits of suppliers (count per year)57101113104143